Choosing the Right Survey

Unsure which survey you need?

There are three levels of RICS survey available, each differing in detail and price, and the one you choose should depend on the type and condition of the property you are looking to buy.

RICS explains the each type of survey and the level of detail they go into:

RICS Condition Report

Suitable for:

  • Conventional houses, flats or bungalows built from common building materials and in reasonable condition.

The RICS Condition Report report gives you:

  • Clear “traffic light” ratings of the condition of different parts of the building, services, garage and outbuildings, showing any areas which require varying degrees of attention;
  • A summary of the risks to the condition of the building;
  • Other matters including guarantees, planning and building control issues for your legal advisers.

Tip: An RICS Condition Report does not include a valuation, but your Surveyor may be able to provide this as a separate extra service.

RICS Homebuyer Report

Suitable for:

  • Conventional houses, flats or bungalows built from common building materials and in reasonable condition.

The RICS Homebuyer Report gives you:

  • All of the features in the Condition Report, plus a more extensive inspection;
  • The Surveyor’s professional opinion on the “Market Value” of the property;
  • An insurance reinstatement figure for the property;
  • Advice on repairs and ongoing maintenance;
  • Issues that need to be investigated to prevent serious damage or dangerous conditions;
  • Legal issues that need to be addressed before completing your conveyancing;
  • Information on location, local environment and the recorded energy efficiency (where available)

Building Survey (Also known as a Structural Survey)

Suitable for:

  • Large, older or run-down properties;
  • Buildings that are unusual or have been altered;
  • If you are planning major works

The RICS Building Survey gives you:

  • A thorough inspection and detailed report on a wider range of issues;
  • A description of visible defects and potential problems caused by hidden flaws;
  • An outline of repair options and likely consequences of inactivity;
  • Advice for your legal advisers and details of serious risks and dangerous conditions.

Tip: A building survey does not include a valuation, but your Surveyor may be able to provide this as a separate extra service.